Gov. Rick Scott is once again blasting Bill Nelson for never holding a “real job” in the private sector and for being a “no show” in his current job in the U.S. Senate.

That’s been a common theme in Scott’s campaign which released its latest TV spot (see below) Monday called, “No Show.”

“Here’s your work week – five whole days,” the announcer says over video of welders working in a factory with a calendar superimposed over the video. “Here’s Senator Nelson’s work week – yep, just three days. Forty-six years in politics but Nelson’s never worked a real job.

“And Nelson failed to show up for national security hearings 45 percent of the time,” the announcer goes on. ‘“No Show’ Nelson skipped hearings on ISIS, Russia, North Korea…It’s time to retire “No Show” Nelson. Give him the rest of the week off.”

In a news release announcing the new ad, the Scott campaign said the spot “highlights Senator Bill Nelson’s record as a ‘No Show’ career politician who doesn’t show up to work for the Floridians he serves, even though his typical work week is only three days long.”

The Scott campaign went on to criticize Nelson’s record on attending hearings dealing with issues vital to national security.

“The Senator’s record of absence includes skipping 45 percent of the Senate hearings on national security, including hearings on ISIS, Russia and North Korea,” said the Scott campaign.

Recent polls have shown the race between Scott and Nelson too close to call. The latest survey of voters released Monday by the Public Opinion Research Lab at the University of North Florida indicates the contest is a tie. Scott was chosen by 45 percent of the voters, while Nelson also received 45 percent. Eight percent of the voters remain undecided.

The poll shows that of Republican voters surveyed, 83 percent say they will vote for Scott with 12 percent choosing Nelson. Just 4 percent say they are undecided. On the Democratic side, 78 percent claim they will vote for Nelson, while 9 percent say they go with Scott. Thirteen percent of the Democratic voters remain unsure who they will select when they cast their  ballots.