Poll: Florida voters support electric car transition by 2030

by | Nov 16, 2021


A statewide poll commissioned by Coltura shows strong voter support for phasing out the sale of new gas vehicles by 2030.

According to a new poll authorized by the Seattle-based environmental group, 55 percent of Florida voters support a policy that would require all new cars sold to be electric by 2030 to reduce air pollution, combat climate change, create jobs, and keep energy dollars in the state. Additionally, 37 percent of Floridians opposed the policy.

Coltura says the proposed policy would allow individuals to still drive, buy, and sell gas-powered cars manufactured before 2030.

“To achieve significant reductions in carbon emissions, we must address a major source of carbon pollution driving the climate crisis: gas-powered cars, trucks, and SUVs,” said Janelle London, co-executive director of Coltura. “The findings of this poll make clear that the public supports a 2030 target date for phasing out gasoline-powered vehicles. It’s time for elected officials to pass laws that reflect the will of their constituents.”

The survey also inquired about attitudes towards electric cars, gasoline usage, and the environment. It found 67 percent of Florida respondents have a positive opinion of electric vehicles (EVs), compared to 25 percent who have a negative opinion. Of respondents planning to purchase a vehicle in the next five years, 43 percent said they were likely to buy an EV.

Notably, the Coltura found that the top two factors influencing Floridians’ likelihood of getting an EV were the availability of a federal tax credit of $7,500 and more public charging stations. Most EVs are currently eligible for the federal tax credit, but the Biden administration has proposed increasing the credit to $12,500 for EVs made in America by union labor.

Nationally, 68 percent of respondents have a positive attitude towards EVs. Black and Hispanic respondents support phasing out gasoline cars by a 2:1 margin. Additionally, 71 percent of voters aged 18-34 favor phasing out gas cars by 2030.

The poll was conducted by Climate Nexus Polling, in partnership with the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication and the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication. The group surveyed 2,678 registered voters across the U.S. in a scientific online poll conducted in October 2021. A sample of 196 voters was taken in Florida (margin of error +/- 8.3%).

2 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    So…if I read this correctly, a CLIMATE NEXUS POLLING COMPANY, IN AFFILIATION WITH 2 COLLEGE AFFILIATED CLIMATE DIVISIONS conducted a nationwide poll, then sorted through those votes attributed to Floridians, and without benefit of the disposition of their (voters) existing vehicle as of 12/31/2029, came to your purported conclusion? What about the 57% of those surveyed who DON’T plan on buying electric?? Supporting the hypothetical, versus actually spending the differential in money and fueling time involved in E vehicles isn’t as cut & dried as Ms. London would lead one to believe.
    While I’m personally an e-vehicle proponent, all the current financial operating benefits of them with progressively be obliterated by governmental entities thru licensing fees, road taxes, and charging taxes. One last question for Ms. London… what are you willing to pay me for my vintage 2028 Bugatti come the end of December the following year, when you’re asking me to never drive it again???

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  2. Mark

    What a joke: margin of error 8.3% … (see the last sentence of the story). It all depends on how you ask the question. From the article it seems that those favoring also wanted continued tax credits and public (read “free”) charging stations. Do you remember when nuclear power plants were supposed to make electricity too cheap to meter ?
    Electric cars are fine vehicles for the right application. Letting politicians (whether federal, state, or local) decide to phase out gasoline or diesel powered vehicles by a certain date is just plain crazy.

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